sandmansister: (Unapologetically Myself)
Thanks to this blog post from Strong Is the New Skinny:

sandmansister: (Unapologetically Myself)
Thanks to this blog post from Strong Is the New Skinny:

sandmansister: (Unapologetically Myself)
Thanks to this blog post from Strong Is the New Skinny:

sandmansister: (Unapologetically Myself)
Thanks to this blog post from Strong Is the New Skinny:

sandmansister: (Dr. Horrible - WHAT?)
It's an increasingly valid and important question. TED Talks are brilliant, and this video by MoveOn.org's Eli Pariser is no exception: http://www.ted.com/talks/eli_pariser_beware_online_filter_bubbles.html

From the TED Talks site:
As web companies strive to tailor their services (including news and search results) to our personal tastes, there's a dangerous unintended consequence: We get trapped in a "filter bubble" and don't get exposed to information that could challenge or broaden our worldview. Eli Pariser argues powerfully that this will ultimately prove to be bad for us and bad for democracy.


It's 9 minutes worth watching. Do it! Get informed. Get involved. Spread the word.
sandmansister: (Dr. Horrible - WHAT?)
It's an increasingly valid and important question. TED Talks are brilliant, and this video by MoveOn.org's Eli Pariser is no exception: http://www.ted.com/talks/eli_pariser_beware_online_filter_bubbles.html

From the TED Talks site:
As web companies strive to tailor their services (including news and search results) to our personal tastes, there's a dangerous unintended consequence: We get trapped in a "filter bubble" and don't get exposed to information that could challenge or broaden our worldview. Eli Pariser argues powerfully that this will ultimately prove to be bad for us and bad for democracy.


It's 9 minutes worth watching. Do it! Get informed. Get involved. Spread the word.
sandmansister: (Dr. Horrible - WHAT?)
It's an increasingly valid and important question. TED Talks are brilliant, and this video by MoveOn.org's Eli Pariser is no exception: http://www.ted.com/talks/eli_pariser_beware_online_filter_bubbles.html

From the TED Talks site:
As web companies strive to tailor their services (including news and search results) to our personal tastes, there's a dangerous unintended consequence: We get trapped in a "filter bubble" and don't get exposed to information that could challenge or broaden our worldview. Eli Pariser argues powerfully that this will ultimately prove to be bad for us and bad for democracy.


It's 9 minutes worth watching. Do it! Get informed. Get involved. Spread the word.
sandmansister: (Dr. Horrible - WHAT?)
It's an increasingly valid and important question. TED Talks are brilliant, and this video by MoveOn.org's Eli Pariser is no exception: http://www.ted.com/talks/eli_pariser_beware_online_filter_bubbles.html

From the TED Talks site:
As web companies strive to tailor their services (including news and search results) to our personal tastes, there's a dangerous unintended consequence: We get trapped in a "filter bubble" and don't get exposed to information that could challenge or broaden our worldview. Eli Pariser argues powerfully that this will ultimately prove to be bad for us and bad for democracy.


It's 9 minutes worth watching. Do it! Get informed. Get involved. Spread the word.
sandmansister: (Default)
From the April 9th issue... this made me think (full contents below for archive purposes):
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1604984,00.html

A Can-Do Nation


The pessimistic story we're being told about America's capabilities is just plain wrong


Bill Bradley

Why are we still addicted to oil? Why do 47 million Americans lack health insurance? Why haven't we made Social Security solvent for the long term? Why are too many of our public schools mediocre? Why have we lost respect around the world?

The answers to these questions lie in the story we're being told about America. It's a "can't do" story—as in "We can't save Social Security" or "We can't cure our oil addiction." It embodies a belief in unlimited individual possibilities but severely limited collective possibilities. It is a story of fear, lack of compassion and America-only policies abroad. And it is fundamentally an untrue story about who we are as a people, but it has been repeated so often on TV and in the press that many in the U.S. have come to accept it. Read more... )
sandmansister: (Default)
From the April 9th issue... this made me think (full contents below for archive purposes):
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1604984,00.html

A Can-Do Nation


The pessimistic story we're being told about America's capabilities is just plain wrong


Bill Bradley

Why are we still addicted to oil? Why do 47 million Americans lack health insurance? Why haven't we made Social Security solvent for the long term? Why are too many of our public schools mediocre? Why have we lost respect around the world?

The answers to these questions lie in the story we're being told about America. It's a "can't do" story—as in "We can't save Social Security" or "We can't cure our oil addiction." It embodies a belief in unlimited individual possibilities but severely limited collective possibilities. It is a story of fear, lack of compassion and America-only policies abroad. And it is fundamentally an untrue story about who we are as a people, but it has been repeated so often on TV and in the press that many in the U.S. have come to accept it. Read more... )
sandmansister: (Default)
From the April 9th issue... this made me think (full contents below for archive purposes):
http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1604984,00.html

A Can-Do Nation


The pessimistic story we're being told about America's capabilities is just plain wrong


Bill Bradley

Why are we still addicted to oil? Why do 47 million Americans lack health insurance? Why haven't we made Social Security solvent for the long term? Why are too many of our public schools mediocre? Why have we lost respect around the world?

The answers to these questions lie in the story we're being told about America. It's a "can't do" story—as in "We can't save Social Security" or "We can't cure our oil addiction." It embodies a belief in unlimited individual possibilities but severely limited collective possibilities. It is a story of fear, lack of compassion and America-only policies abroad. And it is fundamentally an untrue story about who we are as a people, but it has been repeated so often on TV and in the press that many in the U.S. have come to accept it. Read more... )

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